I’m a 21-Year-Old Self-Made Millionaire – But Gen Z ‘No Self-Education’ to Get Rich


He considers his countrymen to be Gen Lay-Z.

It’s not just old people who accuse Zoomers of being lazy. A 21-year-old self-made millionaire is blasting his generation for being lazy people who “lack the self-discipline necessary” to get rich.

“A lot of my generation these days are spoiled brats,” Las Vegas resident Andy Kong told Jam Press about his age.

In his 20s, the Virginia native bucked the stereotype of Gen Z as an aloof guy and became a millionaire, launching ventures ranging from e-commerce firm Project Wifi to cryptocurrency mining data center BlackWater. the controversial private military company of the same name).

Kong’s goal, for his LinkedIn page, is to develop “prestigious projects with noble people”. He often flaunts luxuries The result of his work on Instagramshowcases luxury sports cars and idyllic seaside cruises.

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21-year-old millionaire Andy Kong: “The truth is, most of my generation don’t have the self-discipline necessary to achieve a goal and become rich.”


Kong says her values ​​were instilled by her Asian parents, who forced her to help out at the family nail salon and restaurant from the age of 11.

Kong says her values ​​were instilled by her Asian parents, who forced her to help out at the family nail salon and restaurant from the age of 11.


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Kong raises a sick whip.

Kong raises a sick whip.


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The young baller attributes his momentary success in the business world to being raised by strict Asian parents who taught him the value of money by forcing him to attend the family nail salon and restaurant from the age of 11.

“It taught me how to value my time and how to make sacrifices to achieve my goals,†said the young entrepreneur, who spent almost every waking hour learning a new skill as a result.

“When most kids are sitting at home playing video games, if I have free time, I use that time to learn how to code, start a business, and develop skills,” Kong said. “I didn’t go out partying because I worked all day and helped my brothers.”

Kong founded his first company, Nuclear Node, when he was in the eighth grade.
Kong founded his first company, Nuclear Node, when he was in the eighth grade.
Jam Press/Andy Kong
“When most kids sit at home and play video games, if I have free time, I use that time to learn whether it’s coding, starting a business, or developing skills,” Kong said. describing his discipline.
Jam Press/Andy Kong

Unfortunately, he felt that these values ​​were “sadly lacking” in his generation, for which he was often accused. prioritizing instant gratification over long-term success. “In fact, most of my generation lacked the self-discipline necessary to achieve a goal and become rich,” he said. “A lot of people don’t realize that until they’re stuck in dead-end jobs.”

“People have it a lot easier than in the past and everything is handed to them on a plate,” he added. “They really don’t know the meaning of hard work and so they don’t have the self-discipline to decide on anything.

“That’s why they never get where they want in life,” Kong concluded.

A recent study found that Generation Z is living at home with its parents more than any other generation in recent history — something experts attribute to a lack of preparation for adulthood, among other factors. Meanwhile, other studies show this use of social media and technology – which the highest among zoomers – disrupts attention, disrupts the ability to perform tasks.

“I don’t believe in textbook learning,” Kong said, describing his philosophy on success. “ I have always learned things on my own.
Jam Press/Andy Kong
Kong made his fortune by founding a variety of ventures, from e-commerce firm Project Wifi to crypto-mining company BlackWater.
Kong made his fortune by founding a variety of ventures, from e-commerce firm Project Wifi to crypto-mining firm BlackWater.
Jam Press/Andy Kong

In contrast, Kong claims to have the mentality to focus on success despite all the distractions. “There were a lot of things I wanted to do when I was a teenager, but I wouldn’t be who I am today without them,” she said.

This entrepreneurial mindset led Virginia to drop out of school – to the dismay of her parents who wanted her to study medicine and law – and put all her resources into building a business from scratch. His interest was piqued after watching videos of how people were making boatloads of money through e-commerce. He decided to watch YouTube videos to learn more and eventually launched his first company, Nuclear Node, in the eighth grade.

“I don’t believe in textbook learning,” Kong said, describing his philosophy on success. “I have always learned things on my own. If I didn’t know how to work in a restaurant, I would go on YouTube and learn it.

He added: “My favorite line is ‘Google it,’ because that’s how I do everything.”

“I think the key to success is being consistent and disciplined,” Kong declared.
Jam Press/Andy Kong

Fast-forward a few years, and Kong was proficient in coding, dropshipping (the practice of accepting customer orders without hand-holding them), and e-commerce—talents that eventually made him a protégé of the legendary entrepreneur. Kyle Buckner.

Buckner’s tutelage paid big dividends for Kong’s bank account, which had $100,000 by the time he turned 18. He hit the $1 million milestone at just 20 years old, Jam Press reported.

Like a baby Elon Musk, Kong heads several companies at the same time. In addition to serving as CTO for BlackWater and Project Wifi, Kong also leads Alqenio.com — Dropshipping software for Amazon and Walmart marketplaces that “automate orders, inventory and returns” across the site.

Kong is enjoying the spoils of his success.
Kong is enjoying the spoils of his success.
Jam Press/Andy Kong

Kong believes it’s “only a matter of time” before he creates a billion-dollar tech company.

Despite his meteoric rise in business, Kong insists that there are no shortcuts to success, but rather that people need to be “steady and disciplined.”

“You don’t see a guy in the gym and say, ‘Wow, he lifted 100 pounds,'” the young mogul explained. .”

“Creative people have shiny object syndrome – moving on to another project before you finish the current one, and you have to learn to control that, otherwise you’ll get into the habit of quitting instead of winning,” he said. Cong.
Jam Press/Andy Kong

He added: “Creative people have a shiny object syndrome – moving on to another project before you finish the current one, and you have to learn to control that, otherwise you end up quitting instead of winning. you will be.”

Ultimately, Kong said, he believes people should learn to sacrifice all aspects of life, including family, friends or sports, and find focus rather than trying to “do a few things.”

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