The first ‘living drug’ to treat antibiotic-resistant bacteria developed by scientists

Researchers in Spain have created the world’s first “living drug” for antibiotic treatment Bacteria Growing on the surface of medical implants.

The Barcelona Center for Genomic Regulation and the team at Pulmobiotics created treatment by eliminating the ability of the common bacteria to cause the disease and reusing it to attack harmful microbes.

The study found that 82 percent of the animals who were injected with the treatment under the skin of mice were treated for infections.

Developing resistant bacteria Antibiotics Provides a major step forward in the development of infection treatments on medical implants such as prosthetic joints, catheters and pacemakers, which are highly resistant to antibiotics and make up four-fifths of all infections acquired in hospital settings.

The new treatment specifically targets biofilms, which are colonies of bacterial cells that stick together on the surface to form impenetrable structures that prevent the destruction of antibiotics or human immunity.

Medical implants provide ideal growth conditions for biofilms, and biofilm-related bacteria are thousands of times more resistant to antibiotics than free-floating bacteria.

Staphylococcus aureus, one of the most common types of biofilm-related bacteria, does not respond to conventional antibiotics, requiring surgery to remove any infected medical implants.

Alternative therapies, such as the use of antibodies or enzymes, can cause more toxic and unpleasant side effects to normal tissues and cells.

The authors of the study are investigating whether producing enzymes directly near biofilms is a safe and inexpensive way to treat infections.

Woking with the common species of bacteria, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, was first modified so that the next tweaks would not cause illness before producing two different enzymes, dissolving biofilms, and attacking the bacterial cell walls embedded in them.

Maria Luch, co-author of the study and chief science officer of pulmobiotics, said: “Our technology is based on synthetic biology and live biotherapeutics, designed to meet all safety and efficacy standards for application in the lungs. One of the first goals. Clinical trials are expected to begin.

Luis Serrano, co-author of the Center for Genomic Regulation and Study, said: “Bacteria are ideal vehicles for ‘living medicine’ because they can carry any therapeutic protein to treat any disease source.

“One of the great benefits of the technology is that once they reach their destination, the bacterial carriers deliver continuous and local production of the therapeutic molecule.

“Like any vehicle, our bacteria can be transformed into different payloads targeting different diseases with more potential applications in the future.”

The study is published in the journal Biology of Molecular Systems.

Related Articles

Families of American hostages say Biden is keeping them ‘in the dark’

Families of 26 US hostages who have been "wrongfully detained" abroad have called on the Biden administration to take immediate action to free...

An abusive co-star is not the only thing Sunny fans can do

Warning: Some of the topics in this article can be troublesome, especially for those who have experienced abuse. This is your official trigger...

FBI pressures victims to come forward, accusing former US embassy staff of harassing women working in CIA

The FBI is urging additional victims to come forward if they suffer at the hands of former US embassy staff who have pleaded...

Latest Posts

Families of American hostages say Biden is keeping them ‘in the dark’

Families of 26 US hostages who have been "wrongfully detained" abroad have called on the Biden administration to take immediate action to free...

An abusive co-star is not the only thing Sunny fans can do

Warning: Some of the topics in this article can be troublesome, especially for those who have experienced abuse. This is your official trigger...

FBI pressures victims to come forward, accusing former US embassy staff of harassing women working in CIA

The FBI is urging additional victims to come forward if they suffer at the hands of former US embassy staff who have pleaded...

A former Alabama federal prison guard gets 18 months for sex with inmates in the laundry room

A former Alabama federal prison guard has been sentenced to life in prison for having sex with an inmate in a laundry room...

Alex Murdog and his son allege they sold the property to hide their millions in lawsuits

Alex Murdog and his surviving son Buster are accused of selling their millions of assets from the sons of their dead housekeepers, the...