The Home Office guidance says that deporting Afghans does not pose any ‘real risk of harm’

The deportation of asylum seekers to Afghanistan “poses no real risk of harm,” according to new Home Office guidance, paving the way for some to be sent to a Taliban-controlled country.

The updated guidance should show that if there is protection in the UK, there are “specific reasons why Afghan asylum seekers are simply citizens who are affected by uncontrolled violence.”

This comes just weeks after Britain launched a massive military campaign to protect thousands of people from Kabul as the country came under militant control.

Campaigners said it was “grotesque and immoral” to allow the return of people seeking protection to Afghanistan, saying the guidance “failed to reflect the situation on the ground” and “ignored many threats to basic human rights.”

A Home Office spokesman said Independent For those who refused the asylum, it said it was not enforcing returns to Afghanistan – although advocates said it was “contrary” to the new guideline, which implies that it is safe to return people.

Country Guidance, Update of previous version – this Home Office deleted Following the Taliban’s lead in mid-August — the indiscriminate violence in Afghanistan claims to be “not at such a high level, in general, it represents a real risk of harm to the people sent there.”

It is “open to question whether the situation of international or internal armed conflict persists,” and “whether uncontrolled violence is occurring only in some areas of Afghanistan and to some extent after the Taliban takeover.”

This has come amid increased concern over the Taliban regime in Afghanistan on August 15, with several reports of human rights violations across the country in recent weeks.

The Taliban killed 13 people, including a teenage girl, after the annexation of Afghanistan in August. Amnesty International said This week.

Bella Sankey, director of the detention order, said the government’s refusal to protect people from Afghanistan was “grotesque and immoral.”

“Just weeks after the Taliban’s assassination regime returned to the country and this government rushed to evacuate thousands of British nationals and Afghans from danger,” he said.

“Since then, Taliban persecutors have gone home, harassing and disappearing those who do not support their authoritarian ideology.

Scottish Refugee Council chief executive Sabir Zazzai said the guidance made it “shameful” that Afghanistan was “safe” for some, and argued it was “not in line with the reality of life”.

“We need quick decisions for all Afghans in the UK asylum system,” he said.

There are currently over 3,000 live asylum applications from Afghan nationals in the UK. Ministers are warned that these are people Stuck in a “nightmare mess.” After the Taliban took over their homeland, they refused to listen to more calls to give them the right to remain in Britain forever.

Home Office guidance says that “potential vulnerable groups” have worked with international military forces, women, LGBT people, and ethnic and religious minorities, who have agreed that they should be eligible for asylum in the UK.

Asylum lawyer Alasdair McKenzie called it “welcome,” but said it was not clear how these groups would be defined, and warned that many people at risk from the Taliban would not fit into one of these categories.

He added: “Regrettably, the document is giving the home office an opportunity to send people to Afghanistan, which is unthinkable at this time […] It is difficult to understand the hesitation of the Home Office to shelter all Afghans in the UK at present.

A Home Office spokesman said: “No one in Afghanistan who is at risk of harassment or serious harm is expected to return the country and we are not issuing returns to Afghanistan to those who have refused asylum and have exhausted all appeals.

“All asylum and human rights rights, including Afghan nationals, are treated on their personal merits in accordance with our international obligations.”

Responding to the department’s claims that it is not returning to Afghanistan, immigration lawyer Sonia Lenegan said: “The Home Office should leave these people in the UK instead of leaving them without conditions for an unknown period.

Related Articles

An abusive co-star is not the only thing Sunny fans can do

Warning: Some of the topics in this article can be troublesome, especially for those who have experienced abuse. This is your official trigger...

FBI pressures victims to come forward, accusing former US embassy staff of harassing women working in CIA

The FBI is urging additional victims to come forward if they suffer at the hands of former US embassy staff who have pleaded...

A former Alabama federal prison guard gets 18 months for sex with inmates in the laundry room

A former Alabama federal prison guard has been sentenced to life in prison for having sex with an inmate in a laundry room...

Latest Posts

An abusive co-star is not the only thing Sunny fans can do

Warning: Some of the topics in this article can be troublesome, especially for those who have experienced abuse. This is your official trigger...

FBI pressures victims to come forward, accusing former US embassy staff of harassing women working in CIA

The FBI is urging additional victims to come forward if they suffer at the hands of former US embassy staff who have pleaded...

A former Alabama federal prison guard gets 18 months for sex with inmates in the laundry room

A former Alabama federal prison guard has been sentenced to life in prison for having sex with an inmate in a laundry room...

Alex Murdog and his son allege they sold the property to hide their millions in lawsuits

Alex Murdog and his surviving son Buster are accused of selling their millions of assets from the sons of their dead housekeepers, the...

Analytics: Virginia’s Dead Heat Governor’s Race

Welcome back to another version of OnPolitics. We are still focused on Virginia and its closely watched gubernatorial race. The bellwether race...